Tuesday, February 22, 2011

My Measurement Chart

Getting much more done! The sewing room is getting done! Now I am going to list a few patterns
and I am going to show off the okay skills! Basic alterations to Sewing Patterns
Most of the corrections needed to bring patterns closer to individual body measurements can be done right on the pattern. 


I know this is sounds like pretty common stuff to the pro's but sometimes this can be forgotten. Or maybe the newbie needs a hand. We should teach every little thing we know and hand over even every little bit of basic knowledge because that is the knowledge that can really stump someone who has the thirst and potential, and if they are not handed the simple knowledge they need they can get discouraged..



VintageCorePatterns.com Presents to you an Easy Three-step method for making these basic Sewing Pattern Alterations. This method is used as the starting point for later construction of a fitting shell.

The first step is taking key figure measurements. Some of these are additional to the measurements taken to determine pattern size. For this procedure you will need

tape measure
some string to mark the waist
Perhaps you can enroll a friend to help


The second step is comparing your measurements with the pattern’s to find the places that need alteration. The final step is making the alterations.
This method assumes selection of blouse and dress patterns according to bust measurement, a basis that works well for most women. When it does, bust alterations will usually be simply a matter of re-positioning darts. If, however, the bust is disproportionately large in comparison with the other standard body measurements, or if bra cup size is a “C” or larger, you may find it easier to stay with the pattern size that accords with your other measurements and enlarge the bust area.  The bodice should fit satisfactorily in the back and chest/shoulder area. The high bust measurement is often a clue to situations where this choice is appropriate.

*Pants patterns should be selected by hip measurement and the waistline and length altered if necessary.
One thing to keep in mind when doing Pattern alterations IS the need to keep the design lines in- tact. For example, if you measure less than the pattern and have to alter, don’t take away too much or the Style could be lost. It is generally   better to allow yourself too much fabric than too a little, because it is easier to take in than it is to add on. You can also lose style lines by adding too much, particularly if a garment is intricately seamed. If you discover that you need a great many pattern alterations, it would seem sensible to question  the accuracy of the size you have chosen. Or Perhaps another size, or a comparable size in another figure type. will fit with fewer alterations.

 First Important Step:
Take Key Measurements
Careful and honest measuring is essential. For the most reliable results, stand naturally and wear your customary type of undergarments. If you recently took some of the measurements described below in the course of selecting your pattern size,

note them again (no need to re-measure ) You may want to record your measurements for future reference. If you do, don’t forget to check them every six months or so, or if you gain or lose weight, to see if there have been any significant changes.


I hope you all find this and the the little chart useful!
I sure do!

 
Two: Comparing body and pattern measurements
To decide when and where you need pattern alterations, you must compare your personal figure  measurements  with  the corresponding measurements on the pattern.
In some cases you will  measure the pattern itself; most of the time, as you will find like the many vintage patterns on Vintagecorepatterns.com, the relevant measurements will appear on the pattern envelope.
 This, combined with your measurements and an idea of the kind of fit that
you wish to achieve, will show you where to alter.  Remember that your measurements are not supposed to exactly match those of the paper pattern. No garment can or should fit as closely as the tape measure, for you need enough room in any garment to sit, walk, reach, and bend. The chart below gives the least amounts a pattern should measure over and above your figure in six crucial places. This extra amount is called wearing ease, which should be distinguished from design ease. Design ease is the designed-in fullness that will cause some styles to measure considerably larger, overall or in particular areas, than your figure plus the applicable minimums given in the chart. You cannot know how much design ease has been included in a pattern, but you will be sure of keeping it, and therefore of retaining the style lines of the garment, if you take care to include wearing ease in your alterations There are exceptions to the wearing ease estimates below: a pattern designed for stretchy knit will provide less wearing ease; strapless garments will also be given less; larger figures may need more than the suggested minimum for a truly comfortable fit. Fill in your own measurements on the chart and use them when altering the paper pattern When comparing your measurements With those on the back of the pattern envelope, make no allowance for wearing ease.
 

 
Two: Comparing body and pattern measurements
To decide when and where you need pattern alterations, you must compare your personal figure  measurements  with  the corresponding measurements on the pattern.
In some cases you will  measure the pattern itself; most of the time, as you will find like the many vintage patterns on Vintagecorepatterns.com, the relevant measurements will appear on the pattern envelope.
 This, combined with your measurements and an idea of the kind of fit that
you wish to achieve, will show you where to alter.  Remember that your measurements are not supposed to exactly match those of the paper pattern. No garment can or should fit as closely as the tape measure, for you need enough room in any garment to sit, walk, reach, and bend. The chart below gives the least amounts a pattern should measure over and above your figure in six crucial places. This extra amount is called wearing ease, which should be distinguished from design ease. Design ease is the designed-in fullness that will cause some styles to measure considerably larger, overall or in particular areas, than your figure plus the applicable minimums given in the chart. You cannot know how much design ease has been included in a pattern, but you will be sure of keeping it, and therefore of retaining the style lines of the garment, if you take care to include wearing ease in your alterations There are exceptions to the wearing ease estimates below: a pattern designed for stretchy knit will provide less wearing ease; strapless garments will also be given less; larger figures may need more than the suggested minimum for a truly comfortable fit. Fill in your own measurements on the chart and use them when altering the paper pattern When comparing your measurements With those on the back of the pattern envelope, make no allowance for wearing ease. 


This week I would like to sew rather than being on my computer, 

However, with that, I would like to use this opportunity to show readers how to apply some fitting and alteration rules to patterns. Eww this should be so fun! 




Print your own Measurement Chart  - Remember your best results are at 100%.








xoxoxo


maggie!










 





http://vintagecorepatterns.com/

No comments:

Post a Comment

Thank you for commenting.. Your thoughts, input, and advice are what building this community of other people who love vintage and the vintage inspired lifestyle so wonderful!